Category Archives: Sustainability

Give Something Back: Turning Paper Into Food |Triple Pundit

Give Something Back Business Products consistently upends my preconception that office supply companies must be boring.� If you can be remarkable and generous selling paperclips, then the sky is the limit when it comes to social business.

GSB has long been a leader in, well, giving something back to the community.� Since launching in 1991, it has given $4 million plus to charity, which accounts for over half of after-tax profits. And customers choose which community organizations receive the donations. (Check out previous coverage and an interview with the co-founder, Mike Hannigan.)

Paper = Food is GSB’s newest campaign, addressing local hunger issues.� For every case of 30% or 100% post-consumer recycled paper purchased in California, Portland, and Seattle, GSB and Boise Inc will donate $1 to a food bank in your county. �Each dollar can provide up to 7 meals at a food bank. This initiative has raised about $80,000 for food banks in less than one year.

I think this is just brilliant – it’s a triple win for the customer who gets to support the environment through recycled paper, support her community through food bank donations, and save money with GSB’s competitive prices.�

via Give Something Back: Turning Paper Into Food |Triple Pundit.

via Give Something Back: Turning Paper Into Food |Triple Pundit.

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What Do You Stand For?

Consumers rule the roost when it comes to online conversations. Technology, paired with low trust in business, has created the perfect environment for consumers to broadcast their objections to business practices and programs. And communicating your well-meaning cause effort is no guarantee the chatter will always be nice. Case in point: the online backlash to KFC’s “Buckets for the Cure,” which was met with seething criticism by both consumers and seasoned cause marketers. The disconnect between the issue breast cancer and the product fried chicken was the main point of contention. As the conversation simmered, both the fast food chain and the nonprofit partner came under attack. The fact that this partnership has raised millions to-date is lost, perhaps forever, amid the perfect storm of skeptical consumers and critical chatter online. The best defense? A good offense. Engage the would-be activists early in the process to better predict what issues could arise. In fact, our research found that consumers want to be engaged in the decision-making process for your social or environmental efforts. To help influence initiatives, consumers are willing to take part in a variety of activities, including participating in a survey 70% or emailing, calling or talking with the company or an employee 32%. By providing these forums for consumers to voice their opinions, organizations will be better equipped to react to possible criticism and adjust their programs accordingly.And the benefits don’t end there. When their ideas are put to work, consumers are more likely to buy those products and services 60%, feel more loyal to the organization 54% and are more likely to recommend it to others 51%. So before you tie a ribbon on your soon-to-launch product, why not ask your consumers what they think about the cause, the nonprofit partner and the details? They’ll be eager to engage, and it may just swap a future headache for a brand halo.

via What Do You Stand For?.

via What Do You Stand For?.

Turner Plan on ‘Socially Useless’ Trades Make Bankers See Red – Bloomberg.com

To reduce the appetite for speculative risk, Turner is promoting a levy on financial transactions to divert money to the poor and support efforts to address climate change. The so-called Tobin tax is named after the late U.S. economist James Tobin, a Nobel laureate who proposed a surcharge on currency trading to deter speculation.

“I believe in markets; I believe in enterprise,” says Turner, who numbers Franklin D. Roosevelt and British economist John Maynard Keynes among his personal heroes. “But I have always believed that market economies will not of themselves combine that with environmental sustainability or with a reasonably just and good society. I believe that capitalism needs to be saved from itself.”

via Turner Plan on ‘Socially Useless’ Trades Make Bankers See Red – Bloomberg.com.

via Turner Plan on ‘Socially Useless’ Trades Make Bankers See Red – Bloomberg.com.

Stiglitz Says Crisis Exposed ‘Major Flaws’ in Economics Ideas – Bloomberg.com

eat Depression, having claimed more than 7 million U.S. jobs. Homeowners, investors and “probably” financial executives showed “marked irrationalities” and may have “bought into their own false arguments,” Stiglitz said.

“Economists should be included in the list of those to ‘blame’ for the crisis,” Stiglitz said in the presentation, which Bloomberg News obtained via e-mail. There’s now a “window of opportunity” to build new theories “based on more plausible accounts of individual and firm behavior,” he said.

via Stiglitz Says Crisis Exposed ‘Major Flaws’ in Economics Ideas – Bloomberg.com.

via Stiglitz Says Crisis Exposed ‘Major Flaws’ in Economics Ideas – Bloomberg.com.

Robert Reichs Blog: The Great Disconnect Between Stocks and Jobs

The result, overall, is an asset-based recovery, not a Main Street recovery. Yes, the economy is growing again, but the surge in productivity is a mirage. Worker output per hour is skyrocketing because companies are generating almost as much output with fewer workers and fewer hours. The Fed, meanwhile, has become an enabler to all this, making it as cheap as possible for companies to axe their employees. Money costs so little these days it’s easy to substitute capital for labor. It’s also easy to buy up foreign assets with cheap American money. And it’s now blissfully easy for Wall Street to borrow money almost free and buy all sorts of interests in foreign assets, especially commodities. Thats why were seeing the prices of foreign commodities and other assets go through the roof. At the same time, the Treasury continues to be fixated on keeping banks afloat. The Administrations mortgage mitigation efforts are lagging. Small businesses are starved of credit. The White House has announced a “jobs summit,” which is better than nothing but not nearly as good as pushiing immediately for a larger stimulus, a new jobs tax credit, and a WPA-style jobs program. The Fed and the Teasury have, in effect, placed a huge bet on a recovery driven by asset prices. That’s a bad bet. The great disconnect between the stock market and jobs is pushing stock prices way out of line with the real economy. This isnt sustainable.

via Robert Reichs Blog: The Great Disconnect Between Stocks and Jobs.

via Robert Reichs Blog: The Great Disconnect Between Stocks and Jobs.